Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934-1954 Friday, January 22, 2016


The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York is currently hosting an exhibition focused on the works and career of one of the greatest representative of the Abstract Expressionism, Jackson Pollock.
The exhibition pathway is focused on a range of artworks which extend from the 1930s until the 1956, date of the artist's death. Pollock died in this year at the age of 44, due to a car accident, but even if he was quite young, he was able to experiment a lot on many different techniques and, moreover, he had the capability to make the Abstract Expressionism the first American art movement to wield international influence.
In a couple of decades, Pollock's work passed from mythical to primal figures and scenes, to elements of representation and abstraction, and to radical "drip" paintings, which marked the peak of his career. The most known artworks of Pollock are those drip paintings, that made emerge him in the Abstract Expressionism, the forefront of the post World War II movement. Not only he had influence in this movement in a pictorial way, but his innovations and processes opened new venues for sculpture and performing art as well.

One of the artworks showcased in the exhibition is One: Number 31, 1950 (1950). In a video below, James Coddington, Chief Conservator, and Jennifer Hickey, Assistant Conservator, tell us a bit more about the history of the painting and their work focused on take the artwork back to its original state.
The exhibition path is made of traditional paintings, made brushing oil paint on canvas, and painting in which sand an other materials are involved, as well as lithography, screenprinting, engraving and various form of drawing. All those artworks on view are drawn entirely from the collection of The Museum of Modern Art, and there are approximately fifty of the eighty-eight works in the collection.

This exhibition is a retrospective of one of the most famous american artist, whose life has been quite troubled, and the MoMA of New York has made a huge work on displaying his work of two decades, explaining a behind the scene in a conservatory point of view of one of the artist's major works.
The exhibition is organized by Starr Figura, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, and is on display until May 1st, 2016.

Installation view of Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (November 22, 2015–March 13, 2016)
Photo by Thomas Griesel
© 2015 The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Jackson Pollock (America, 1912-1956)
Full Fathom Five, 1947
Oil on canvas with nails, tacks, buttons, key, coins, cigarettes, matches, etc., 50 7/8 x 30 1/8″ (129.2 x 76.5 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Peggy Guggenheim, 1952
© 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Installation view of Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (November 22, 2015–March 13, 2016)
Photo by Thomas Griesel
© 2015 The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Jackson Pollock (American, 1912-1956)
Untitled (4), state II of III, c. 1944—45
Engraving and drypoint, plate: 14 15/16” x 17 5/8” (22.3 x 30.2 cm); sheet: 18 3/4 x 24 13/16” (47.7 x 63 cm)
Publisher: unpublished. Printer: the artist at Atelier 17, New York. Edition: unique trial proof
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Lee Krasner Pollock, 1969
© 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Jackson Pollock (American, 1912-1956)
Easter and the Totem,1953
Oil on canvas, 6’ 10 1/8” x 58” (208.6 x 147.3 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Lee Krasner in memory of Jackson Pollock, 1980
© 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Cover image:
Jackson Pollock (American, 1912-1956)
One: Number 31, 1950, 1950
Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 8′ 10″ x 17′ 5 5/8″ (269.5 x 530.8 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange), 1968
© 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York